Janus Document Examination          
                The Handwriting Expert
We Verify, Qualify and Testify

(407) 628-1090
 
222 W Comstock Ave.
Suite 201
Winter Park, FL 32789

Call for a free consultation.
(407) 628-1090

Frequently Asked Questions



"They forged my name! What do I do now?" 
If you do not have the original questioned documents get  scanned copies. If the documents are in the courthouse get certified copies from the clerk of the court. 

Get samples of the known signature.  The more the better. The signatures should preferably be written around the same time as the questioned document.  You can find signatures on leases, insurance papers, contracts, deeds, military papers, and greeting cards.  Contact us for more places to look.

“Is this a forgery?” I am often queried. Here are some frequently asked questions I have received from attorneys concerning the role of the Forensic Document Examiner.

Should I hire an expert as a consultant or as an expert witness?


Consultants can sit with you during a trial proceeding and offer insight. An expert witness will present a finding in court and will only appear for testimony, unless other arrangements are made with the court.


2.       What should a Letter of Opinion contain?


The question or task posed by the attorney should be clearly stated. The known and questioned documents are listed and identified; the scientific process should be described by the handwriting expert as followed in the study, and the opinion reached should be expressed by known standards of the industry.

3.     

  sh  What should be conveyed about the case initially?


Often an examiner is contacted by both sides of a case. To avoid conflict of interest, share the name of client and other litigants as well as the opposing attorney and any experts disclosed by opposing counsel.  Withhold case information and claims until no conflict is assured. Once retained, the handwriting expert should be detailed with a description of the case and its related documents. The attorney should disclose how many documents are in question and how many known signatures are available for comparison.


4.      How are document examiners paid?


The document examiner is paid a retainer to begin the case. Fees are generally posted and set. The fees are not related to outcomes. Document Examiners are paid for their time and research design for questioned issues.


5.       How calendared are Document Examiners?


Often Document Examiners are scheduled out three to four months ahead.  It is good to inform the examiner of hearings, depositions, court appearances, and any other deadlines critical to the case. Since the field of Document Examiners is small, Document Examiners often travel several states to fit attorneys’ needs.


6.       Why should an expert be used?


A competent, qualified handwriting expert may provide crucial evidence to move your case forward, or, in the alternative, alert you to crucial trouble spots.


7.       Do the documents have to be originals?


While original documents are always preferred, we can use first generation photocopy or court copy or a scan of the original document. While a fax can be used for initial review, fax technology tends to distort the images and should not be used for court.